Routine

Just the word conjures thoughts of monotony and stagnation, of office drones stuck in dead-end jobs. But routine doesn’t have to be associated with the slow flickering death of creativity. Routine can actually help bring more creativity into your life and get you closer to your goals much faster than any haphazard anti-schedule.

That’s not to say spontaneity doesn’t play an important role in our lives. I believe that spontaneity is the mother of all creativity. A willingness to let go of all assumptions and try new things, to try old things with a different mindset, to throw caution to the wind and take risks, and to step into uncertainty forces us to think in new ways and innovate. But without routine, it’s difficult to harness that creativity to get closer to our goals. Continue reading

Charting a course

Damn early days. 21 Damn Early Days, to be exact, to figure out the routines, goals, and habits that will get me closer to the person I want to become. But before I can chart a course, I need to figure out where I’m going.

Who is the person I want to become?

I could go on about how I want to be kind, loving, generous, honest, authentic, and confident (which is all true), but I’m going to focus on one specific characteristic for the next 21 days as part of Chasing Sunrise’s Damn Early Days programme: Continue reading

Thirty days without gossip

At the start of 2016, I made it my goal to rein in my gossip consumption, particularly the amount of mainstream media, Facebook, and YouTube I consume. If you’re confused as to why anyone would want to spend less time staying informed, I suggest you start with my last post, where I talk about a few of the negative aspects of consuming gossip.

This week (in case you still weren’t convinced that you should put down that morning paper), I thought I’d focus on some of the benefits of avoiding gossip and one hack I use to keep my gossip intake in check. Continue reading

Gossip

If we read of one man robbed, or murdered, or killed by accident, or one house burned, or one vessel wrecked, or one steamboat blown up,…or one lot of grasshoppers in the winter,—we never need read another. One is enough. If you are acquainted with the principle, what do you care for myriad instances and applications? — Henry David Thoreau

As people are wont to do around this time of year, I suspect many of you have one or two, or perhaps ten, resolutions that you’ve come up with as we begin the journey into 2016. Some of these may be things that you want to learn, things that you want to get better at, or things that you’d like to avoid completely.

If I may, I’d like to add one more thing to your list of habits to break: Continue reading